mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
My next big project -- after daughter's afghan, which is now nearly ten years old -- may be a historic afghan pattern by Anne Orr.  It's Tunisian crochet in a worsted-weight yarn (modern equivalent to period "four-fold Germantown").   If I want an afghan I can wash as necessary, throw across couches, throw across laps, lather rinse repeat -- in short, one that will stand up to wear and time, what yarn do you recommend?  This is not a good time for Susie's Heirloom Hand-Dyed Handspun, because the finished product is 57" x 45", give or take gauge. Cheaper is better, but not so cheap as to be itchy or unpleasant to knit  I'm leaning acrylic for durability and washability, but I'm happy to hear what you'd use.   The primary colors are black, grey, and white, with a cross-stitch pattern in tapestry-weight yarn over the top.

Here's a color reproduction from the Dover reprint.   Here's a black-and-white picture of the original afghan, which Katharine Cornell worked on nightly in The Barretts of Wimpole Street.


mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
Les Trois Mousquetaires | The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas (a.k.a. books only)
Richelieu
D'Artagnan
Milady de Winter
(open slot)

Golden Age of Piracy RPF
Anne Bonny
Mary Read
(open slot)
(open slot)

Greatcoats Series - Sebastien de Castell
Falcio val Mond
Brasti Goodbow
Kest
Valiana

This year, for me, it's swashbuckling all the way! I will do a pimp post later; let me know if you have people you want in the open slots.

mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
 The attorney general of New York has protested to Equifax, and they have "clarified" that the waiver of rights to sue only applies to the security-monitoring service itself, and not to the existing security failure.

Expand the last question in the FAQ (https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/frequently-asked-questions/)  to see this clarification.
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
You're fine if you use the existing form to check if you're affected, because it doesn't ask for a waiver.  However, don't sign the form Equifax offers for credit monitoring.  In the fine print, it waives your right to join class action suits. 
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
Equifax just leaked personal info including any or all of birthdates, addresses, Social Security numbers, and/or credit card information for roughly half the adult population.

No.  Really.

To check if you were affected, go here:

https://trustedidpremier.com/eligibility/enroll.html


If you get a date back, you *were* affected; set yourself a calendar reminder to go back to the site on the appropriate date and register for ... something yet to be determined. 

Equifax has known about this since July 29th.  The CFO and two other senior executives sold big chunks of stock three days later.
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
 If you're a scholar of folklore, Stith Thomas is an honored name.  He created Motif-index of folk-literature : a classification of narrative elements in folktales, ballads, myths, fables, mediaeval romances, exempla, fabliaux, jest-books, and local legends.   This is and was the Dewey Decimal system for folklore.  

T11.4.4. Love through seeing marks of lady’s teeth in fruit which she has bitten

T11.6. Wish for wife red as blood, white as snow, black as raven.
T85.4.1. Ring of Fastrada. (Tove‘s magic ring.) Lover keeps body of dead mistress (wife) intact by means of magic ring. When ring is removed from her finger, the body immediately decays and he is cured of his love. 

A full six volumes of Stith Thomas will set you back a pretty penny.  But the University of Alberta has put it online!  Hurrah!
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
Oh, look at this fencing club preserved unchanged since the late 19th century. 
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
Green's Dictionary of Historical Slang,  all 3+ million words of it, is available free online.  Without a subscription, you can only search individual words or browse alphabetically.  You can't see the etymology and cites (damn it), but it's still a fun resource.  49 pounds (oog) for the full megillah if you aren't affiliated with an academic institution that subscribes.
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)

Endorsement of Alan Turing footsteps

Transcript:

#AskGCHQ We've got a great support network for LGBT staff and you get to walk in the footsteps of Alan Turing ^B


As a friend of mine murmured, "Perhaps skip some of the steps."

* Wiki: The Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) is a British intelligence and security organisation responsible for providing signals intelligence (SIGINT) and information assurance to the British government and armed forces.

mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
I gave up on Joss Whedon, Male Feminist Icon, after the first episode of DOLLHOUSE.   I was creeped out by FIREFLY's Madonna/whore thing, but somehow I reasoned around it.   The revelation that he's been using that reputation to predate on women is horrible, but not a shock.

When I read Kai Cole's statement -- do read if you have somehow missed it -- I kept flashing on the pivotal conversation in Gaudy Night, in which Harriet and Peter talk about spouses who have eaten each other, and whether there is such a thing as a marriage in which nobody is eaten.  Kai Cole was and is an architect.  Starting, by her telling, with Buffy, she dedicated hersef to  emotional labor for Joss Whedon, including producing projects that he worked on.  Harriet Vane would tell you that Whedon ate Cole.  And, going only by the direct quotations Cole gives, when Whedon confessed to her, he praised himself -- told her what a powerful stud he was, and that it wasn't his fault he was surrounded by "aggressive" actresses.

Whedon's public response to Cole's statement:

“While this account includes inaccuracies and misrepresentations which can be harmful to their family, Joss is not commenting, out of concern for his children and out of respect for his ex-wife.”

Let's unpack this.  

1.  Whedon cheated for over a decade, but Cole is the one who's hurting their children.
2.  Whedon used feminism as a tool to get laid, but now he's showing Cole respect.
3.  Cole has direct quotes from Whedon's letter, showing exactly who he is, but the account "includes inaccuracies and misrepresentations"

So.  "You're a bad mother, and I could explain how much you're lying, but I won't because unlike you I'm a good father and respect the children and you."

Whedonesque, bless them, have gone read-only and shut down.
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
I follow an excellent curated list of reporters. Thrown in as the token conservative is Salena Zito. Zito's claim to fame is that she called Pennsylvania and thus the nation as going for Trump early, and she was right. She has positioned herself as the voice of Forgotten Non-Urban America. (This reached hilarious levels when she toured "non-urban America" and counted in, not only a commuter suburb of Gary, Indiana, but people who actually commuted to Gary.)

Today, Salena retweets a 1994 post in which she explained it all to us, race edition. (Save for nausea before clicking.)

Briefly, the essay says that a black family moved into her white neighborhood in 1969. I'll let her explain it.

Race in Pittsburgh, as in many industrial cities, was volatile in 1969. Society was changing rapidly for whites and blacks and, as with most change, some people reacted with fear, others with anger, and many with no brains at all.

In typically horrible timing, government-enforced integration coincided with Lyndon Johnson's “Great Society,” which bulldozed iconic ethnic neighborhoods — tearing apart lifelong experiences, communities and ways of life — in favor of public housing.

It was supposed to compensate for past injustices but it merely punished one community to make amends to another.

No mention that the "iconic ethnic neighborhoods" included black neighborhoods, of course, or the neighborhoods -- almost certainly including Zito's -- whose sale contracts forbade the owner to sell to a black person.  No, that neighborhood just mysteriously grew up all-white.

Thanks to my parents, the Chatmans weren't considered “black people.” They were just new neighbors, and we did what we always did when someone new moved onto the block — baked chocolate-chip cookies and delivered those to their home.
Three months later — after spending our days jumping rope, playing tag and all of the other things that 9-year-old girls do — a brick shattered the Chatmans' front window; another smashed their car's windshield, and the perpetrators, a couple of teenage boys, tried to burn a cross on the lawn.

“Your dad chased those young teens ... he caught all of them, single-handedly, and held them for the police,” Carnisa recalled. “I remember him telling them how ashamed he was of them.”

And everything was okay then! And Carnisa, her black friend,  repaid her by saving her from a black riot in high school! And therefore:

So the solution to our nation's racial discourse should be handled by us individually, one person at a time — and not by exploiting bad deeds done by both sides that only further the hatred.

Note that it never occurs to Zito that Carnisa had to go to school with the brothers and sisters and friends of those boys who burned a cross.  Or that there were other people who put their resentment of "tearing apart lifelong experiences" into words and action.  No.  Zito made friends with Carnisa and they're still close friends and that's what everybody should do!  And nobody (among Zito's friends) considered the Chatmans black, so that made everything better!

You won't read an essay that better encapsulates the belief that individual virtue is better than collective action.   With a triple scoop of  white privilege.

e:  Chaser.  Mother Jones finally does what nobody else is doing and interviews rural black voters.

Turner’s mom, who cleans houses in town for a living, went to work a couple of days after [the election], and her employer, an older white woman, brought up the results of the recent election. The two had talked politics before—Turner’s mom is a Democrat, and her employer is a Republican. “Well, you might as well come and live with me now,” the employer said. “You gonna be mine eventually."

mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
 I was playing the admirable game "West of Loathing" when I had to solve a number puzzle where I had to add up pressing buttons with different values (411,295,161) to reach a specified total of 3200.  I button mashed, then said, to hell with this, this is a linear programming equation, plugged it into Wolfram Alpha, and solved for x,y,z.

God bless technology.

P.S.  If you enjoy puzzle games, silly humor, and combat that can be dialed back so that even the slowest-trigger-fingered in the West -- that would be me -- can play it, try West of Loathing.  I find it engaging, focusing,  and soothing, in times that need some soothing.
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
 Found in junk drawer while searching for Ex-Acto knife:  one pair of rounded-tip plastic Safe-T-Cut child's scissors.

My offspring are 26 and 23.
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
 8AM. Phone rings.  Phone rings a second time, which means it's less likely to be spam.
Me: sits bolt upright in bed and picks up phone.
Dad: Your mother is in the hospital with heart fibrillation.  She should be home tomorrow or the next day.
Me: I assume I shouldn't fly out.
Dad: Oh, no, no, she needs to rest and relax.
Me: When did this happen?
Dad: A day ... no, day before yesterday.
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
because he didn't understand why there were tears rolling down.

Bad manners

Jul. 5th, 2017 07:35 pm
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
You, as a manager, ask a transwoman on your team to review a draft survey, which asks respondents "What is your gender?", with the options being Male, Female, or Transgender. She replies to the survey:

'Transgender' is not a gender. Transgender people may be male, female, gender queer, non-binary... If you want to know if a survey respondent is transgender, you need to explicitly ask that question."

How do you respond?
Read more... )

Read Coraline Ada Ehmke's whole essay about being a woman at Github. My strong suspicion is that a fact-based response like the above would have passed unnoticed from a man, but was considered too aggressive for a woman. There should have been softening language, like "I'm afraid that" and "I know you're working from the best intentions" and "Please don't mind me mentioning one issue".

I've sent a lot of emails like the one above. Good thing I wasn't working for Github at the time.
mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
Three different preventative drugs for migraine are in late-stage trials and doing well. This is a big damn deal. There are drugs that are abortives -- once you start feeling migraine symptoms, you take them to drastically reduce those symptoms -- but all the preventatives are off-label for something else.

To give you some idea, the preventatives I take are:
  • Lyrica (Federally approved for seizures, neuropathic pain, and fibromyalgia)
  • Botox (Federally approved for torticollis, lots of other clenched-muscle conditions, and various kinds of cosmetic uses)
In the past I have tried beta and calcium-channel blockers (high blood pressure), multiple anti-epileptics, and IIRC one antihistamine that had to be special-ordered from Canada.

The migraine-specific triptan drugs, when they were introduced, were a revolution: instead of blunting the pain you were short-circuiting the migraine cycle.   I have hopes that one of these three drugs will be a similar game-changer for prevention.  Fingers crossed.

In the meantime, I'm overdue for a Botox treatment; will schedule tomorrow.



mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
Donald Trump's Fourth of July post is a video of a mostly -- I'll be honest, I quit thirty seconds in, and at that point it was entirely -- white choir and band performing an anthem to Trump's campaign slogan.

This isn't an uptime "We like Ike" ditty, it's an incantation.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/882186896285282304

So. We are living in a fascist state, we know where they're going, and I don't know how to stop them. Here's a better-written anthem as a chaser.

mme_hardy: White rose (Default)
Women Entrepeneurs Speak Out on Sexual Harassment

Wendy Dent, 43, whose company Cinemmerse makes an app for smart watches, said she was sent increasingly flirtatious messages by a start-up adviser, Marc Canter, as she was trying to start her company in 2014. Mr. Canter, who had founded a software company in the 1980s that became known as Macromedia, initially agreed to help her find a co-founder. But over time, his messages became sexual in nature.

In one message, reviewed by The Times, he wrote that she was a “sorceress casting a spell.” In another, he commented on how she looked in a blue dress and added, “Know what I’m thinking? Why am I sending you this — in private?”

Mr. Canter, in an interview, said that Ms. Dent “came on strong to me, asking for help” and that she had used her sexuality publicly. He said he disliked her ideas so he behaved the way he did to make her go away.

As is now usual in harassment cases, once women are bold enough -- at considerable risk -- to name names and circumstances, more witnesses show up to say "Oh, me too."
At least five women have said "Yeah, I had the same problem with Dave McClure", and other have spoken up about Marc Canter.

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